Parody

Nicholas Suzor tries to work out where parody fits into Australian copyright law …

here.

A parody, or is it a satire ?, here.

Copyright owners versus ISPs

Reports today that the UK Government has ‘brokered’ a deal between copyright owners and ISPs forcing ISPs to take a more pro-active role in cutting off illegal downloaders …

According to the IPKat things may be a little more complicated: at least one of the ISPs claims all it has agreed to do is write to the downloader and tell them that someone alleges they infringe copyright.

IPKat here.

Kim has links to the UK Government’s announcement here and expands on the details.

All this is directed at downloaders. Here, of course, ISPs (I really mean ‘carriage service provider’, start here), engaging in Category A conduct get some protection; but nonetheless can have court orders inflicted on them to cut off accounts – who is going to bear the legal costs of a successful court action to achieve this? And there is more limited protection for other types of conducrt depending on whether the activity is Category B, Category C or Category D activity – I kid you not!

Of course, if you’re not a ‘carriage service provider’, you should be shaking in your boots; especially once you get a letter from someone claiming to be a copyright owner (or acting for one) see Metro on George and Cooper v Universal, although depending on your degree of involvement you may be able to argue the latter case in particular is a bit unusual.

Even if you are a ‘carriage service provider’, it may well be that you can’t afford to sit back and wait for letters of demand (I mean, notifications) to come in:

first, you may still be liable for infringement if you become aware of infringing material or of facts or circumstances that make it apparent that material is likely to be infringing …;

secondly, Viacom and the English Premier League (no, there is no copyright in a sporting spectacle, but there is in the broadcasts) contend under the US templates of these provisions that Google must be aware because there is too much infringing ‘stuff’ out there ….

Dollars v sense

The latest plans to extend copyright term in the EU seem to have fired up a collected who’s who of copyright academics …

A band of intrepid professors have taken to the pages of the Times to point out why it’s a bad idea, via IPKat also having a go at performer’s rights

Another group calling themselves “Sound Copyright” have also reacted strongly (and negatively), via IPKat again

And, soon to visit these shores (here and here), Bill Patry http://ipkitten.blogspot.com/2008/07/sound-copyright-time-to-take-action.htmlweighs in from across the water

and, not to be outdone, some academics have decided to counter-attack against the copyright owners’ rather restrictive interpretation of the ‘3 step test’: IPKat and Patry both joining in.

Jib Jab did it again!

The folks who brought us This Land have now found

Time for some campaignin’ …

here.

Now, why does that tune sound so familiar?* Why does the scenery behind Barack Obama seem familiar?

According to Excess Copyright, it wouldn’t be legal in Canada.

But is it parody or satire?

Fortunately, in a country where a clip of the Prime Minister singing happy birthday to “a” cricketer was neither news nor criticism/review (see here [34] and [39] then here), we now have fair dealing for both parody and satire.

Do you think they took too much? Surely, they added enough original contribution?
* here – I’m not going to suggest you click on the number 56